Friday, July 20, 2012

Queen Anne Has Washed Her Lace

Queen Anne, Queen Anne, has washed her lace
(She chose a summer's day)
And hung it in a grassy place
To whiten, if it may.
~ Mary Leslie Newton

Until the past few years, I had never taken much notice of Queen Anne's Lace.


QAL late day sun
It grows rather profusely around the fields and parks and what's to notice about a plain white flower whose roots smell like carrots, anyway?



Plenty.



QAL for Linda
It would seem that they're not such a plain white flower after all. My blogging buddy, Linda once wrote that each Queen Anne's Lace head has a tiny wine-coloured flower near the middle of its face. That was news to me. And it was also a reminder to look more closely next time. I learned that not all of them have that little dark flower but many of them did. Thank you for the eye-opener, Linda. This one is for you, my friend.





QAL rosy edge
They don't only have that deep red flower in the center, either. As the Queen Anne's Lace head begins to open up, the tiny flowers on the fringe are this lovely, delicate shade of pink. That's another thing I'd never noticed before this June.






QAL opening edge
This one has only just begun its stretch to greet summer.





qal in the pink2
Others are in the pink of the season.





QAL red dot 2
As the sun lowers in the sky, the lacy aspect of the flower is more evident than ever.






QAL bug
Suddenly there's a fair bit of activity on the head of most of these flowers. I'm not sure what this bug is but he was quite fascinated with Queen Anne.





qal red bugs mating
I think we should call this one "Love in Bloom."





QAL from below at sunset
The setting sun as seen through the underside of the flower.





QAL at sunset
After getting up close and personal to Queen Anne's Lace with my camera, I've come to realize that it's not such a plain white flower after all. Wouldn't you agree?

More photos coming up soon.

59 comments:

Rita said...

I always loved the lacy look of Queen Anne's, but you have shown me things I had forgotten about them from when I was a kid in the fields in Minnesota and examined everything closely. These are gorgeous shots! Thanks! :)

Linda Reeder said...

I've known about Queen Anne's lace most of my life, from growing up in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. I have actually collected seed and planted it in my garden. It is a lovely addition to summer bouquets. Thanks for this lovely post.

Pierre BOYER said...

Like lace....
Best regards from France,

Pierre

Nadezda said...

Yes, it's a real lace, very fine lace!

Stephen Hayes said...

I've probably walked past this flower a thousand times without paying attention. Now I'll be on the look-out for it. Such is the power of photography.

SueAnn Lommler said...

What a fabulous job you have done. You have artfully captured the elegance of the Queen Anne's Lace!!!
Loved your photos!
Hugs
SUeAnn

Daniel LaFrance said...

Very cool pic assortment! Fresh perspectives... gotta love that, eh.

ADRIAN said...

I, as always really admire the last two images. I never tire of these contre jour under exposed shots.

Steve Gravano said...

They are beautiful flowers and photos. You have redeemed yourself with this tribute to the Lady in White Lace.

Leah J. Utas said...

There's nothing plain about it. Lovely pics, Hilary.

Mimi said...

Absolutely agree Hilary!
Thanks for the intro. to a beautiful flowering plant. I'm sure we have it growing here, so I will look out for it now.
Those last 2 photos are stunning.

Gary's third pottery blog said...

such a pretty little flower at the summer roadside :)

DJan said...

It is indeed a beautiful flower. It looks a lot like some other flowers too, so I'll need to take a closer look at them all, now! Gorgeous shots of a gorgeous flower.

Ruth's Photo Blog said...

You have shown the stunning beauty of this flower. I absolutely LOVE the silhouette picture.

TexWisGirl said...

i just love your photos, dearheart! the way you use light is like a painter using yellow. :)

Anvilcloud said...

I agree with you. There's a lot to this macro world of yours.

Linda said...

Thanks for the shout-out, Hilary. If my pointing out that little red flower in the middle of Queen Anne's Lace resulted in these wonderful images, well it's a blessing for all of us. I'd never noticed the pink fringes before. Very pretty. And the backlit photo is stunning...like a snowflake.

Kerri said...

Oh my ..... my heart skipped a beat when I saw that sunset through the "lace" - that is absolutely amazing!

I LOVE the way you "see" HIlary!!

rosaria williams said...

Not so ordinary under your lenses!

Karen (formerly kcinnova) said...

Wow. Your macros are spectacular! Each photograph better than the one before (a difficult feat!) and you had the grace to bokeh the "love" in 'Love in Bloom.'

sage said...

I love Queen Anne's lace and have over the past several years (except last year when I was in Asia) written poems about the flower. I've been seeing it everywhere lately.

Jo said...

All of them are so pretty. You caught one stretching, I love that. The last one is perfection.

messymimi said...

Queen Anne's Lace is worth a second look, and we don't see much of it down here. Thanks for the beautiful close ups!

ellen abbott said...

these are just beautiful. I had queen anne's lace in my garden for the first time this year. I don't remember seeing the dark pink flower in the center. I'll have to pay more attention next spring.

photowannabe said...

The name Queen Anne's Lace is perfect for this amazing flower.
How delicate and intricate.
Your macros are wonderful for showing us this lacy flower.
Have a terrific weekend Hilary.

Robin said...

You are an absolute master with camera in hand! Some lovely macro shots again... Can I come for lessons some time?

Laura Delegal - Leroy Photography said...

We don't have any in my immediate area, but am always thankful to find it when we travel a few hours north. All images are beautiful. Have a good weekend.

Gillian Olson said...

Thank you for sharing these pictures with us, I will certainly take a closer look at it next time I encounter it here.

Shammickite said...

What can I say that hasn't already been said about your pictures of Queen Anne's Lace?
A pretty and delicate flower. And I have always wondered why the little floweret in the middle is pink.... there must be a reason. To attract bees perhaps?
Off to Wikipedia to find out......

Shammickite said...

Here's the answer... from Wikipedia:
Wild carrot was introduced from Europe and naturalised in North America, where it is often known as "Queen Anne's lace". It is so called because the flower resembles lace; the red flower in the center represents a blood droplet where Queen Anne pricked herself with a needle when she was making the lace. The function of the tiny red flower, coloured by anthocyanin, is to attract insects.

So now we know!

Brian Miller said...

very cool...i did not know that on the flower in teh middle...will have to pay better attention myself...love the light on it in that last pic....

Mom of A and a said...

wow! I absolutely love the last photo!!

yaya said...

I'm heading out to take a close look at the Queen Anne's lace growing around our mailbox...that bug pic made me blush..shame on you!

Hilary said...

I love and adore that last photo.

Red said...

You've given us a very different and detailed look at a flower that we have to take a second look at. Sometimes you have to look at the tree and forget about the forest.

Gail Dixon (Louisiana Belle) said...

Awesome. I never knew the flower had anything other than white in its attire. Such beautiful shots, showcased so well in all its different forms.

TSannie said...

One of the most beautiful flowers there is. What glorious photos you've taken, my friend.

Linda said...

Wonderful photos! Thanks for the close-up views of this flower.

Indrani said...

It is a very beautiful flower, what is even more amazing is the way you have captured them. I was at a loss to select the most stunning one.

CiCi said...

The not so plain white flower as seen through the not so plain photographer.

June said...

My mother told me that that purple flower in the center was a purple heart, so that's what I see when I look at it.
They are really gorgeous flowers, aren't they? Even when they're dried and dead.

beth said...

i never really pay attention to it either as it's plentiful and everywhere....i guess that means i take it for granted :(

what fun photos of something so ordinary !!

Out on the prairie said...

I've heard to use the root as a strong carrot flavor.Lovely blooms,and the bug you weren't sure of is a Sawfly: Arge ochropa.

lime said...

you've really captured some gorgeous shots of something you once thought was so plain. queen anne's lace is a fun reminder of my childhood. i used to pick it with my grandmother and we'd color them with food dye.

Russell said...

As always, very nice photos.

We have a lot of Queen Anne's lace here in Iowa / the Midwest portion of the United States.

Praire flowers are always very nice. They often look very fragile but are extremely tough - they have to be to survive our weather.

The native plants have roots that are often several feet below the surface.

Always enjoy stopping by and seeing your work.

Take care.

Reb said...

Great shots of a very lovely flower. I will have to keep an eye out for some.

ds said...

Queen Anne's lace is one of my favorite wildflowers. I was told that the deep red spot at the center of some flowers was the place that Queen Anne pricked herself while making the lace. If you pick some, and stand them in colored water, the flower will take on the hue of the water (oh, the projects weary grandmothers thought up for their grandkids!). Seriously.

louciao said...

I hadn't noticed that delicate pink tone on the lace. It's so lovely. Pierre and I once picked massive bouquets Queen Anne's lace from a roadside in Quebec, filling the back of the van. We "bestowed" them upon some friends before we headed west. I wonder if they were as excited about the flowers as we were. Never heard from them again...

ZeldaMom said...

I will never again look at this flower without thinking of you!
These are beautiful pictures. I took some pictures with my phone this week of them in the noonday sun. Not the best pictures, but we were in Missouri visiting and I'm from Minnesota, and I don't know that we have much of this flower in MN. If we do, it's in peoples yards and I haven't noticed. I did notice the little reddish center though, my hubby thought it was a bug...he didn't have his glasses on!

Murr Brewster said...

I had been thinking there was always a little bug in the middle of a Queen Anne's Lace, but maybe it was the darker floret. You have enjoyed them properly, my dear, which is to say not in your house. They really don't work in bouquets, as much as you might want to try.

Scott said...

Wonderful macros.

Denise said...

Truly fabulous photos!!!

Bob Bushell said...

Beautiful images of "Queen Anne's Lace".

Susan in the Boonies said...

My late Momma's favorite. So lovely!!!

SandyCarlson said...

Thank you for sharing the marvel that is this plant. The purple you capture is new to me, and I am grateful.

Hilary said...

Thank you all for stopping by and sharing what you know, and for letting me know that you enjoyed this post. Your kind words mean so much to me. :)

Zuzana said...

Beautiful shots dear Hilary of such a seemingly ordinary flower. You express here in words and images one of my dearest sentiments - if we only look, so much waits to be seen.
Love your closes ups of beautiful insects, tried something similar the other day but the wind moved the stalks too much and the insects would not sit still for me to get a decent shot.;) So thank you for yous.;)
xoxo

Lisa Gordon said...

Hilary, these photographs are gorgeous!
Like you, I never knew that Queen Anne's Lace started out pink. I was photographing some last week, and there it was. Makes me love this plant even more than I already do.

RedWillow ~ a Beauty seeker said...

Take my breath away. Im in love with them all. Stunning and so gorgeous.