Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Written in Stone

The past is history written in stone that can't be altered. The future is transitory and never guaranteed.
Today is the only thing you can alter for certain. Make the most of it."
~ Sherrilyn Kenyon

This post might come across as kind of cold. It's neither the most colourful (except for a few) nor does it exude warmth but there are some interesting sites around and I hope to offer you some concrete evidence of that. See what I did there?

outside the laundrymat
I snapped this image early in May. This dilapidated bench sits outside of a laundry mat. A discarded Tim Horton's cup and an empty coffee can sits on the concrete nearby. We take our morning java seriously in Peterborough.





rocky turtle
I thought that these stones resembled a turtle's head and front foot as it emerged from the water.





liftlock
This very impressive piece of architecture is the dual lift lock on the Trent Canal in Peterborough. It was built in 1904 and remains the oldest and tallest (65ft/20m) hydraulic boat lift in the world. Let's go climb up to the top.





liftlock2
From Wikipedia: The lock has two identical bathtub-like ship caissons in which vessels ascend and descend. No external power is needed. The lift lock functions by gravity alone using the counterweight principle. One caisson always ascends and the other always descends during each locking cycle. When one caisson reaches the top position, it stops 12 inches (30 cm) below the water level of the upper reach, and the control valve is closed.





liftlock3
You can see a larger boat on the top left anticipating its drop into the canal below so that it can continue it's journey southward. The smaller boats (only one visible in this photo) at that bottom will arrive at the upper area of the canal at the same time.





liftlock4
They briefly meet near the middle.





liftlock5
Just a few more feet to rise and the gates will open, allowing the small boats to continue on their way. The same goes for the large boat which we can no longer see down below.





from lookout at Combermere
Another place and time - this is the lookout near Combermere, a half-hour drive from where I lived previously. This rocky view of the highway below was a good place to sit and think.





Kamaniskeg lake at Combermere lookout3
A glance beyond the highway took in this beautiful view of Kamaniskeg Lake.





graffiti meow
Back in Peterborough, a graffiti artist's teary rendition of my favourite creature - the feline.




graffiti
If you stand back a bit, you can take it all in.





graffiti 2
Here's a bit more from a different section.





chalk
On a nearby ledge, someone decided to add some less permanent art of their own.





chalk2
They also kindly left their chalk behind for others to use. Grab a piece and start drawing!





downy feather
I'll leave you with this feather. I was sitting on a rocky ledge, splashing my feet in the river when the wind gently caught the feather which in turn, caught my eye. It was clinging to to side of the rocky wall beside my leg.

More photos coming up soon.

38 comments:

joeh said...

THe rock does look like a turtle.

I hate graffiti!

Bob Bushell said...

A great piece of structure to sail by, lovely lock.

Rita said...

That lock is fascinating! I never knew there were locks that lifted the boats with water like that! (Hey--I am a Minnesotan and grew up with lakes, creeks, ponds, and rivers--LOL!) Now you have me wondering if there are locks anywhere on the Mississippi River? I have walked across the headwaters, though.

I can see the turtle emerging. Love the caught feather but would never sit up so high--makes me woozy. I don't mind graffiti if it is contained in an area...on man-made concrete--LOL!

Out on the prairie said...

Like to watch on the Missiissippi when barges go through.

Marie Smith said...

Locks are incredible! Love the photos!

Karen said...

I love that lookout at Combermere. Spent a few good hours watching the clouds drift by there myself.

Linda at To Behold The Beauty said...

I enjoyed the photos and information about the lock. And I loved the view of Kamaniskeg Lake from your rocky perch.

Tabor said...

I do admire the crispness and composition of your macro shots. You really have an eye for that. I am going to assume the coffee can in the first photo held something less pleasant than coffee. Those locks are always impressive, scary how we can lower and raise rivers for ourselves.

Andy said...

As always, wonderful photos and great storytelling.

John M said...

I learned something new about locks. The stones do look like a turtle. Thanks for sharing.

messymimi said...

Very pretty sights!

TexWisGirl said...

got the first image. that's it.

Cloudia said...

What an entirely wonderful post! That lock is amazing

yaya said...

Not cold at all! Very interesting and informative...and the white feather reminded me of my Nephew. After he passed we would find little white feathers in very unusual places...usually when we were talking about him or thinking about him. I like to think it's his way of saying hello from the other side. Have a good rest of the week!

Ruth Hiebert said...

Interesting photos.Those locks are rather fascinating.

Red said...

the boat lifts are interesting for this little prairie boy.

sage said...

That's a pretty high lock!

The Furry Gnome said...

I've always wondered exactly how that lift lock worked! Your pictures explain it well.

Mage said...

I wish you would photograph that lift more often. What a marvelous feat of engineering for the time. I love all the other things....resolutely indeed...but I am knocked over by the lift.

Linda said...

Interesting how you started with something depressing and worked up to some fun pictures.

Laura~Pretty Pix said...

Loved this series. Really great images of the lock, and the info you included.
Thanks for sharing your adventure with us!

DJan said...

Saw the "turtle" too. And these pictures are anything but cold. The chalk series is fun, too. :-)

Lady Fi said...

How lovely - I like that delicate feather.

ellen abbott said...

love your photos.

Gayle said...

As ever, love your perspective and photos.

The past is history written in stone that can't be altered. The future is transitory and never guaranteed.
Today is the only thing you can alter for certain. Make the most of it."
~ Sherrilyn Kenyon

So perfect, Hilary! Thanks for the best quotes EVER!
{{{}}}

SK Waller said...

I totally saw the turtle, and that lift lock is a thing of wonder!

Gary's third pottery blog said...

The countryside where you lived a year ago was so pretty, but your town now is SUCH a great community.

Pauline said...

A few words, a few pictures, and you've made something special of the day. Thanks :)

William Kendall said...

The lift lock is very impressive, as is that view in Combermere. I've been in that area a couple of times.

A Cuban In London said...

Love that bench. In fact, the whole photo composition is superb. Thanks.

Greetings from London.

Kat said...

The lock is amazing! Wow!
Fantastic photos as usual!

Suldog said...

I came here to wish you a Happy Thanksgiving, but got the bonus of seeing more of your excellent photography. As always, your stuff entrances. Well, Happy Thanksgiving!

Linda said...

I think it is very colorful, both artistically and naturally. My favorite of the bunch is the lake, although I find the locks very interesting and love the different views you give us. I hope you're having a wonderful Fall.

Phyllis E said...

Your post gave me quite a 'lift', Cuzzie.

Yael said...

Your posts are always interesting, your photos exquisite! Even if I don't comment every time, I do enjoy! :-)

photowannabe said...

You have definitely given us some CONCRETE evidence of your walk around your area.
I love the Lockes and your description. I have been through locks on the Mississippi River and thought it was fascinating.
Your feather picture is delightful.

Polly said...

Love the “turtle”, well spotted. WOW the Trent Canal certainly is impressive, fantastic view from the top. I was born in Peterborough, UK

Daryl said...

the lock story/history was stellar ...